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THE 9th ANNUAL

DESMOND TUTU

INTERNATIONAL PEACE LECTURE
7th OCTOBER 2019

Strive Masiyiwa
Tackling Corruption in the Private & Public Sector:
Restoring Citizen Trust Locally and Globally.

“I am a leader by default, only because nature does not allow a vacuum.”

Archbishop Desmond Tutu

The Desmond & Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation

The Desmond & Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation was established in Cape Town in 2013. It is a centre of knowledge and discourse, a repository for intellectual property, and a platform to reconnect people to each other and to their own integrity.

The Foundation is a physical space for exhibitions, programmes and events, and an intellectual space for the development of human consciousness about the critical issues affecting the earth and its inhabitants.

LATEST NEWS

Strive Masiyiwa to Deliver 9th Desmond Tutu International Peace Lecture

Strive Masiyiwa, the Zimbabwean-born philanthropist and technepreneur, will address the 9th Annual Desmond Tutu International Peace Lecture in Cape Town City Hall on the archbishop’s 88th birthday, 7 October 2019. He will address the topic: Tackling corruption in the public and private sectors – Restoring citizen trust, locally and globally.…

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Archbishop Tutu Describes Appointment of New Foundation Chairman as “A Wonderful Choreography”

The Desmond and Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation (DLTLF) has appointed a powerful duo to lead the next stage of its growth and development. Chairman Niclas Kjellström-Matseke and CEO Piyushi Kotecha harness a set of diverse and complementary skills in leadership, governance, sustainability and organisational development. The Tutu and Matseke families have a…

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BULLETIN

30 years ago…
“WE MARCHED IN CAPE TOWN, AND THE BERLIN WALL FELL”

Thirty years ago, today, Archbishop Desmond Tutu led a massive march for peace through the streets of Cape Town that became a tipping point in the anti-apartheid struggle.

The night before the event, although its permission had not been sought, the government made an unprecedented announcement. It would “allow” the march. “The door to a new South Africa is open,” then-Acting State President FW De Klerk said. “It is not necessary to batter it down.”

About 30 000 people pitched up outside St George’s Cathedral. Led by Tutu, Reverend Allan Boesak, leaders of the inter-faith movement and the United Democratic Front, and the Mayor of Cape Town, Gordon Oliver, the gathering went off without a hitch. Even the police seemed friendly.

The march capped a week of intense drama, which began on 6 September, the day South Africa held its last race-based election. The country was a cauldron. The anti-apartheid movement had identified the election as a focal point of struggle. A State of Emergency gave police unprecedented powers, which they used with impunity on election day.

A distraught Archbishop Tutu learned that the violence had claimed the lives of at least 20 anti-apartheid protestors in Cape Town, alone. That night, in his prayers, he remonstrated with God over the unfairness of the brutality.

It came to him that the most appropriate response was to call people together to march for peace. “It wasn’t as if God told me directly, ‘Hey, you must march’. But I had a strong feeling it was the right thing to do,” the Archbishop said later. “Some of my colleagues in the anti-apartheid structures weren’t impressed. They said it was not a very democratic decision. But I asked them: ‘How does one argue with God?’”

In the days leading up to the march, organisers lobbied foreign diplomats, multinational companies and opposition members of parliament for support.

Behind the scenes, the government scratched its head for a response. It attempted, through an emissary, to save face by asking the march organisers to apply for permission. But the approach was rebuffed. The march would proceed, with or without permission.

The following month, the government began releasing political prisoners, and the country took its first tentative steps down the road to democracy. And a month after that, the Berlin Wall fell.

“We marched in Cape Town, and the Berlin Wall fell,” the Arch said later.

WORDS OF WISDOM

THE ISSUE

CLIMATE CHANGE IS THE HUMAN RIGHTS CHALLENGE OF OUR TIME

“The most devastating effects of climate change – deadly storms, heat waves, droughts, rising food prices and the advent of climate refugees – are being visited on the world's poor. Those who have no involvement in creating the problem are the most affected, while those with the capacity to arrest the slide dither. Africans, who emit far less carbon than the people of any other continent, will pay the steepest price. It is a deep injustice.” – Desmond Tutu, The Guardian, September 2014

Desmond Tutu, The Guardian, September 2014

TODAY

IS ONE WEEK ENOUGH? 170 MEDIA OUTLETS DEDICATE NEWS TO CLIMATE CHANGE

“One hundred and seventy global news outlets have signed for the week-long ‘Covering Climate Now’ pledge, starting from 16th September... participants range from wire services to newspapers, magazines, educational institutions, TV and radio channels and even independent journalists. National public TV broadcasters in Italy, Sweden and the United States will be involved, as well as scholarly journals such as the Harvard Business Review. Many of the outlets partaking are globally renowned, such as Bloomberg, CBS News, The Guardian, Vice Media and Business Green…” – Euronews, 29 August 2019 https://www.euronews.com/living/2019/08/29/170-media-outlets-will-dedicate-news-coverage-to-climate-change-for-one-week

Australian Broadcasting Corporation, July 2019

TOMORROW

Climate change: Big lifestyle changes ‘needed to cut emissions’

“People must use less transport, eat less red meat and buy fewer clothes if the UK is to virtually halt greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, the government's chief environment scientist has warned.” BBC, 29 August 2019 – https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-49499521

MARK Z. JACOBSON & MARK A. DELUCCHI, Scientific American, Nov. 2009
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